Stone Cut Bodies

Live healthy, live vibrant, and fall in love with your body.


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Easy (Seriously) Gluten Free Pizza

A while back, a friend gave me a recipe for gluten free pizza that was also low carb. It was delicious. The problem? The entire thing was made out of cheese, including the crust. (I know, I know, that sounds more like a pro than a con, but it was quite heavy.) I wanted to find a way to lighten and healthy it up. This week I had a pizza craving, and I was about to whip up a pie, when I remembered the hummus I had just made. I wondered if I could substitute some of the cheese in the crust with hummus? Guess what, I could! It’s still delicious and afterwards I don’t feel like I ate a brick! Also, the chickpeas in the hummus are loaded with fiber for a healthy digestive system. Happy Health!

 * My culinary posts are meant to be guidelines, not recipes. They are different from what you would usually find in a cookbook, because I think cooking should be inspired and new every time you do it. If you like heat, add a sh**load of cayenne or jalapenos to one of my recipes. If my guideline calls for cilantro but cilantro tastes like soap to you, leave it out. When I cook, I get a buzz from the thrill of creation. The same can happen to you.

Gluten Free Pizza

Chickpea Crust Pizza

1 cup-ish homemade or store bought hummus (or you could use chickpeas ground to a paste with a little olive oil and water in a food processor or blender)

3/4 cup-ish shredded Parmesan cheese

2 eggs

1 tsp garlic powder

1 tsp onion powder

several shakes of salt to taste

1/2 cup marinara or pizza sauce

3/4 cup mozzarella or shredded cheese of your choice

toppings of your choice (I like sliced bell pepper and broccoli)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Blend first six ingredients in a food processor until well combined into a “dough.” Cover a cookie sheet with parchment paper and spray paper with olive oil. Spread dough evenly over paper. Bake 10-15 minutes, or until dough solidifies and becomes a very light brown. Cover dough with sauce, cheese and toppings and cook for another 10 minutes or until cheese becomes bubbly. Allow to cool slightly before eating. This is also great cold!


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The Simplicity of Boat Cooking

Boat

Recently I had the good fortune to visit my sister in The Bay Area, who was, at the time, living on a small sail boat. Boat life is anything but simple. There are leaks, mold, plumbing issues, the stench of desiccant and a quarter mile walk to the showers, to name a few inconveniences. But these minor hassles are offset by ocean breezes, waking up to harbor views, sunsets, and the simplicity of boat cooking. Because of the economy of space due to such a small living area, the kitchen is paired down to the bare essentials: a pan, a pot, a hot plate and a few mismatched utensils. My sister cooked for me a few times, and everything was delicious. She made several one-pan dishes, with the veggies cooking alongside the meat and seasoned with basic spices. I can’t live all my days on a boat, but I can cook simple, tasty “boat meals” whenever I like. Happy Health!

* My culinary posts are meant to be guidelines, not recipes. They are different from what you would usually find in a cookbook, because I think cooking should be inspired and new every time you do it. If you like heat, add a sh**load of cayenne or jalapenos to one of my recipes. If my guideline calls for cilantro but cilantro tastes like soap to you, leave it out. When I cook, I get a buzz from the thrill of creation. The same can happen to you.

Masala Spiced Chicken with Carrots and Broccoli

Masala Chicken

however many chicken breasts or tenders you feel like making

4-6 carrots (chopped into circles)

head or so of broccoli (chopped into bite-sized pieces)

kefir (or plain yogurt) to cover chicken in a baggie

masala or any Indian seasoning (or any seasoning) you like

shake of garlic powder

dash salt

tbsp or so olive oil

chicken broth (optional)

Marinate chicken in a baggie for several hours in the refrigerator with kefir, olive oil, garlic powder and seasoning. Heat frying pan to medium heat, add olive oil, cook carrots for a few minutes, adding a splash of water or broth if they stick to the pan. Add broccoli and chicken. Stir veggies and flip chicken after 4-5 minutes. Cook additional 4-5 minutes until chicken is done. Pretend you’re on a boat overlooking a glorious sunset over the Pacific and enjoy!


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Creamy Cauliflower Truffle Oil Soup

As I’ve mentioned in previous posts, I love soup. I also love cauliflower. And I love truffle oil so much I think it should be a beverage. Since temperatures in Los Angeles have been plummeting into the low 50s, I thought why not throw these things I love together to make a hearty hot soup? It was a good thought, because it turned out to be G.d. delish. Happy Health!

* My culinary posts are meant to be guidelines, not recipes. They are different from what you would usually find in a cookbook, because I think cooking should be inspired and new every time you do it. If you like heat, add a sh**load of cayenne or jalapenos to one of my recipes. If my guideline calls for cilantro but cilantro tastes like soap to you, leave it out. When I cook, I get a buzz from the thrill of creation. The same can happen to you.

Creamy Cauliflower Truffle Oil Soup

Cauliflower Truffle Soup

1 head cauliflower, chopped into medium florets

1 or 2 cups water

1/4 cup-ish chopped onion

1 shallot, chopped (optional – I just happened to have one on hand so I chopped it up and threw it in)

1/2 cup-ish chicken broth (veggie if you’re veggie)

1/4 cup almond or regular milk

1 tbsp butter

1/2 tbsp olive oil

1-2 tbsp truffle oil (depending on how much you love the stuff)

10 cloves garlic (less if you want anyone to ever love you again)

salt to taste

chives, chopped for garnish

Steam cauliflower in a pot with water over medium heat for 20-30 minutes until cauliflower is soft. Drain water, puree cauliflower in a food processor, adding olive oil and almond milk.

In a medium pot, saute onions, garlic and shallot in butter until browned over medium heat, adding chicken or veggie stock if they stick to the pot. Add pureed cauliflower along with chicken stock and truffle oil. Remove from heat and let cool slightly. Puree soup in food processor to remove garlic and onion lumps. Top with chives and try not to eat the whole pot!

 

 

 


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Cooking with Hemp! (AND Booze!)

So I am currently studying to become a Holistic Nutritionist, and for an assignment this week I was instructed to find a healthy food I have never cooked before and make it into something magical. Uh…. I was in a bit of a bind. I’ve cooked almost everything at least once. So I set off for Whole Foods in search of a bright, new health food. It was difficult. Kohlrabi? Been there. Celeriac? Done that. Nutritional yeast? Yes, even nut yeast. I was about to give up. And then I saw them. Hemp seeds! A ha! I have never even tasted hemp seeds let alone cook with them. So I filled a bag from the bulk section and brought them home. Now what the heck to do with them? I took a little taste to see what I was working with. Their flavor was like a cross between walnuts and quinoa to me – nutty but grain-like at the same time. It’s been a little chilly in L.A. recently (I think it got down to 50 degrees a few days ago!) and I have been wanting to try my hand at homemade tomato soup, so I decided to make tomato soup with hemp seeds. Lucky for me it worked out great and tasted delicious! And I discovered hemp is quite the nutritional powerhouse, loaded with vitamins, minerals, protein, and Omega 3 fatty acids. All that in a bag of hemp! Happy Health!

* My culinary posts are meant to be guidelines, not recipes. They are different from what you would usually find in a cookbook, because I think cooking should be inspired and new every time you do it. If you like heat, add a sh**load of cayenne or jalapenos to one of my recipes. If my guideline calls for cilantro but cilantro tastes like soap to you, leave it out. When I cook I get a buzz from the thrill of creation. The same can happen to you.

 

Creamy Tomato Soup with Hemp Seeds

Creamy Tomato Soup with Hemp

five or six medium tomatoes, chopped

ten to fourteen cloves of garlic, chopped (you should maybe use less, I like a LOT of garlic)

1/4-1/2 cup red wine

1/2 cup or so tomato juice (optional)

1/2-1 cup chicken or veggie broth

1/2-3/4 cup almond milk (or whatever sort of milk-like liquid you have on hand)

1/2 cup or so hemp seeds

tsp or so chopped fresh basil (you can use dried if you don’t have fresh)

1 tbsp butter

1 tbsp olive oil

sprinkle of paprika

Parmesan cheese (optional)

 

Put garlic in a medium to large pot with olive oil and butter. Cook on medium heat until garlic starts to brown. Add a splash of red wine if it starts to stick to the pan. Add tomatoes, broth, tomato juice and paprika. Keep everything to a low boil until the tomatoes become very soft and the ingredients become stew-like. Add wine and boil five or so additional minutes. Add basil, turn off heat. Add almond milk and let cool slightly. Blend in a food processor or blender until you have the consistency you’d like. Return to pot and add hemp seeds. Heat and serve! Garnish with Parmesan if that seems like a good idea to you.

 

 

 

 


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Roasted Cauliflower with Pesto Cream

I love to roast vegetables this time of year. It warms my apartment,  fills the place with a homey, rich aroma and makes everything feel cozy. Roasted veggies taste great on their own, but I always like to add a little sauce when I can.  And pesto gives this dish a nutritional boost with fresh basil, which provides not only vitamins and minerals, but also contains flavonoids which act as powerful antioxidants. It also has antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties.  Take that, regular cream sauce! Pesto can tend to be a bit heavy, so I lighten this version with almond milk to replace some of the olive oil. Happy Health!

* My culinary posts are meant to be guidelines, not recipes. They are different from what you would usually find in a cookbook, because I think cooking should be inspired and new every time you do it. If you like heat, add a sh**load of cayenne or jalapenos to one of my recipes. If my guideline calls for cilantro but cilantro tastes like soap to you, leave it out. When I cook I get a buzz from the thrill of creation. The same can happen to you.

 

Roasted Cauliflower with Pesto Cream

Cauliflower with Pesto Cream

half head of cauliflower or one small head

1/2 tsp or so garlic powder

several tablespoons olive oil

1 red bell pepper

1 bunch fresh basil

several tablespoons shredded Parmesan cheese

tablespoon or so sunflower seeds (you can use pine nuts if you would like a more traditional pesto, but I didn’t have any on hand so I substituted and the sunflower seeds worked great!)

1 clove garlic

several tablespoons almond milk

dash salt

 

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Cut and break the cauliflower into smallish florets. In a bowl, mix these with a tablespoon (maybe a little less) of olive oil, a few sprinkles of garlic powder and salt to taste. Place on parchment paper on a cookie sheet. Core and seed the bell pepper. Rub the outside with olive oil, place on parchment paper with cauliflower, and put the whole thing in the oven for 40 minutes to an hour. The cauliflower should be golden brown. The pepper should be wilted looking and very soft. They may take different amounts of time to cook, so check on them regularly.

While they are cooking, throw basil, garlic clove, Parmesan cheese, sunflower seeds, almond milk and a tablespoon of the olive oil into a blender or food processor. Blend until saucy.

When slightly cooled, cut the roasted red bell pepper into slices. Arrange the cauliflower on plates and drizzle with pesto. Add bell pepper as garnish around plate. Savor!

 


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Soup for (The End of) Summer

For the last few days it has been about a gazillion degrees in Los Angeles, and that may be an understatement. I still love to cook and I still need to eat and I always love soup so gazpacho is the perfect no-cook meal and it’s loaded with vegetables. Plus I can make a bunch of it and just pull this chilled soup out of the fridge whenever hunger strikes. As an added bonus it is healthy and light, full of vitamin C, vitamin A, potassium, magnesium and fiber to name just a few of the nutrients in all those veggies. You can add chicken, shrimp, tofu or any kind of protein you like to round out this soup and give it a little oomf. Cheers to the dog days of the end of summer!

 * My culinary posts are meant to be guidelines, not recipes. They are different from what you would usually find in a cookbook, because I think cooking should be inspired and new every time you do it. If you like heat, add a sh**load of cayenne or jalapenos to one of my recipes. If my guideline calls for cilantro but cilantro tastes like soap to you, leave it out. When I cook I get a buzz from the thrill of creation. The same can happen to you.

Gazpacho

I made three versions, I love them all in their own special way.

Basic Gazpacho:

Basic Gazpacho

3 or 4 medium tomatoes, any kind you like

1 medium cucumber

1 medium green pepper

1 small jalapeno

1/2 small onion

2 cloves garlic

1 small bunch cliantro

1 tbsp-ish balsmic vinegar (you can use any type of vinegar you like, but I prefer balsamic for this soup because it adds a complexity beyond just tanginess)

juice of half a lime

1/2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

dash salt

Chop all the veggies into chunks and chop the cilantro. Through it all in a food processor and pulse until you have a consistency you like.

 

Avocado Gazpacho:

Avocado Gazpacho

I added one medium avocado chopped into chunks to the basic recipe and pulsed in the food processor. It adds a richness and heart-healthy fat to the soup. This was delicious, but looked a bit like baby vomit so….

 

Kefir Gazpacho:

Kefir Gazpacho

I had never made this before today, but I was looking for something to make the soup creamy and happened to have kefir (cultured dairy with a consistency between milk and yogurt) in my fridge.  I thought, “What the heck? I’ll dump this in there…” And I’ll be darned, it was freakin gooooood! And kefir adds protein and tummy-healthy probiotics! I added about 3/4 of a cup to the basic recipe guideline. Add more or less to attain the creaminess you want.

They were all so tasty, I actually licked the bowl. Happy Health!


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Cauliflower “Rice”

Cauliflower “rice” is similar to cauliflower mashed potatoes popularized by the South Beach Diet about a decade ago. If you aren’t familiar with this dish, it is basically vegetable alchemy, turning a tasty, healthy vegetable (cauliflower) into a delicious, starchy, decadent-tasting dish (mashed potatoes.) In my opinion, cauliflower mashed potatoes works a little better than cauliflower rice (it’s a texture thing) but cauliflower rice works great in saucy dishes with lots of flavors. It’s a wonderful low carb, low cal alternative to rice to sop up juices of Indian or Thai cuisine or the like, (although I learned the hard way it does not make good sushi rice.)

There are approximately 395,062 recipes for cauliflower rice on the internet. This is mine. I’m in love with this stuff and I’ll use it in lots of future posts. Happy Health!

 Cauliflower “Rice”

Cauliflower Rice

1 head cauliflower (this will make A LOT of “rice”)

1 small onion, chopped

4-8 garlic cloves (depending on how much you like garlic)

1/2 tbsp-ish rice bran, grapeseed or coconut oil

1/4 cup-ish chicken or veggie broth

salt to taste

 

It’s really simple. Shred a head of cauliflower in a food processor or with a cheese grater. If you use a food processor, the cauliflower chops best and most evenly with the “pulse” option. Sauté onions and garlic in a pan with oil. Add chicken or veggie broth and cauliflower. Cook until cauliflower becomes tender and you can even brown the cauliflower a bit for extra flavor. Add salt to taste. I make a bunch of this at once and use it for dishes throughout the week. A healthy, delicious time-saver! And you can gorge on it because it is super low calorie (minus a pat of butter, of course….)