Stone Cut Bodies

Live healthy, live vibrant, and fall in love with your body.


Leave a comment

Hulk Balls

These surprised me. I wanted to make a raw, vegan truffle that was also delicious, but I expected the little confections to actually look like truffles, and these turned out bright green. At first I thought I’d have to scrap the recipe and start over, but when they were finished, I adored their uniqueness, and everyone I shared them with enjoyed that too. Besides, they look like Hulk balls, and this is perfectly fitting because almost every ingredient in these balls is a superfood to make your body healthy and strong. Happy Health!

* My culinary posts are meant to be guidelines, not recipes. They are different from what you would usually find in a cookbook, because I think cooking should be inspired and new every time you do it. If you like heat, add a sh**load of cayenne or jalapenos to one of my recipes. If my guideline calls for cilantro but cilantro tastes like soap to you, leave it out. When I cook, I get a buzz from the thrill of creation. The same can happen to you.

Hulk Balls

Hulk Balls Inside 2

1 cup-ish walnuts
2-4 tbsp spirulina
vanilla bean (or a few drops of vanilla extract)
dash salt
1 avocado
1/2 cup cacao nibs ground to powder (a coffee or spice grinder is best for this) plus 1/4 cup for rolling
stevia or coconut sugar or nectar to sweeten

Grind all ingrediets in a food processor (except the 1/4 cup of cacao nibs for rolling) until a doughish consistency is formed, then place food processor bowl in fridge for one hour. Roll into little balls and roll the balls in cacao powder. Feel amazing and strong like The Hulk!


Leave a comment

Cashew Milk

Many people are turning to alternative milks because of allergies, dietary restrictions, or simply because dairy products don’t make them feel good. There are lots of alternatives to try, from rice milk to soy milk to coconut milk, but I have found my favorites are the nut milks. They tend to be creamier and richer and hold up better in coffee or tea or over whole grain granola. I regularly buy almond milk, but discovered it has several additives I’d prefer not to consume. So I started making cashew milk and found that not only is it preservative and additive free, it tastes freakin fantastic. And cashews are a great source of magnesium, essential for strong bones, and they are lower in fat than almost any other nut. The fat they do contain is unsaturated and heart healthy. So put that in your tea and drink it! Happy Health!

 * My culinary posts are meant to be guidelines, not recipes. They are different from what you would usually find in a cookbook, because I think cooking should be inspired and new every time you do it. If you like heat, add a sh**load of cayenne or jalapenos to one of my recipes. If my guideline calls for cilantro but cilantro tastes like soap to you, leave it out. When I cook, I get a buzz from the thrill of creation. The same can happen to you.

Cashew Milk

Cashew Milk

1 cup cashews, soaked for several hours in filtered water

2-4 cups water, depending on the consistency you like

dash stevia

vanilla seeds from 1/2-1 bean (or you can use a natural extract if you have that on hand)

pinch sea salt

Strain cashews from soaking water and discard the water. Blend all ingredients in a blender for several minutes until a very creamy consistency is reached. If you have a high-powered blender like a Vitamix, you won’t necessarily need to strain the liquid. If your blender is less powerful, you should strain the milk through a fine mesh strainer, or a nut milk bag, which you can order from Amazon or purchase at some home-goods stores. Be sure to shake the milk each time you pour it.  Yum!


Leave a comment

STILL Have Zucchini From the Garden…? Make Chocolate Coconut Truffles!

Ok, I promise, this is my last zucchini recipe for a while. They’re just so darn abundant this time of year! And really, who doesn’t love sneaking a little healthy produce into their truffle? I served these to several friends, none of whom guessed zucchini was a hidden ingredient. One friend commented how decadent and rich they tasted. While they do have some (healthy!) fat, they are low sugar, low carb and relatively healthy, as far as truffles go. They are easy and quick and don’t require the use of an oven. The perfect August treat! Happy health!

 * My culinary posts are meant to be guidelines, not recipes. They are different from what you would usually find in a cookbook, because I think cooking should be inspired and new every time you do it. If you like heat, add a sh**load of cayenne or jalapenos to one of my recipes. If my guideline calls for cilantro but cilantro tastes like soap to you, leave it out. When I cook I get a buzz from the thrill of creation. The same can happen to you.

Chocolate Coconut Truffles (With Zucchini!!!!)

Chocolate Coconut Truffle

There are several ways to go about this, and I tried multiple recipes that I liked. What you basically need is cocoa, something to sweeten the cocoa, something to make the cocoa wet and something to make it all stick together. I used:

about 3/4 cup unsweetened organic cocoa powder

stevia (I add this to taste. It’s quite potent, you just need a few sprinkles, maybe 1/2 tsp or less. This is an all natural calorie free sweetener. It is made from a plant and should have no added ingredients. You can get it in most health food stores or Trader Joe’s. You could use agave or honey here, but then make sure to use less of the wet ingredients)

1/2 cup-ish shredded zucchini (shredded with a cheese grater)

1/2 avocado (you can omit this if you don’t have one on hand, but add more of a wet ingredient)

1/4 cup-ish coconut milk (the thick kind that comes in a can, not the kind people are using to put in coffee)

1 tbsp coconut oil

1/4 cup-ish coconut flour (enough to make the dough ball up and stick together) 

dash vanilla extract

dash of salt

1/4 cup-ish shredded coconut

 

Mix all ingredients except shredded coconut in a food processor, adding the coconut flour last as needed to make the dough stick. Roll little bits of the dough into balls on parchment paper. Coat with shredded coconut. This should make 12-16 little truffles, depending on how big you roll them. Store in refrigerator.

 

 

 


1 Comment

Cashew Cream Cheese

I recently went to the doctor because the skin on my hands was literally slowly bubbling then ripping open. (That’s an appetizing intro to a food blog entry, no?) She told me I had psoriasis and had to lay off the gluten. No problem, I’m already off that because it hurts my belly. And dairy. Ouch. At the time she delivered this devastating news, in my fridge I had shredded mozzarella, Delice de Bourgogne, sharp cheddar, plain yogurt, cheese sticks, cottage cheese and finally cream cheese. You could say I am a cheese enthusiast. When everyone else orders dessert, I order cheese. And while I can’t completely give it up, (a good, stinky blue cheese makes my toes curl,) I am severely limiting my intake to a nibble here and there. So I needed a fix. I buy different types of soy cheeses to use from time to time in salads or recipes, and I’ve tried several of the store bought non dairy cream cheeses, but they have additives I don’t like to consume. I’ve tried “cashew cheese” at vegan restaurants around Los Angeles, so I decided to experiment and make this for myself. This tasted the best to me, I hope you like it too. Happy Health!

 * My culinary posts are meant to be guidelines, not recipes. They are different from what you would usually find in a cookbook, because I think cooking should be inspired and new every time you do it. If you like heat, add a sh**load of cayenne or jalapenos to one of my recipes. If my guideline calls for cilantro but cilantro tastes like soap to you, leave it out. When I cook I get a buzz from the thrill of creation. The same can happen to you.

Cashew Cream Cheese

Cashew Cream Cheese

1 lb raw cashews

enough water to cover the cashews in a pot (2-4 cups)

1 clove garlic

1/4 – 1/3 cup unsweetened almond milk, depending on the consistency you like

tbsp or 2 nutritional yeast

tsp or 2 miso paste, any kind you like

juice of 1 medium lemon

dash onion powder

dash salt if you like

enough water to cover the cashews in a pot (2-4 cups)

 

Soak the cashews in water for 1-4 hours. Some recipes will tell you this is optional, but I think it is necessary to really soften the cashews up and get a good, creamy spread. Drain and blend in a blender or food processor with all other ingredients, adding the almond milk slowly and checking for the consistency you’d like. If you don’t have access to nutritional yeast or miso paste, you can omit them and still have a decent “cheese”, they just add to the richness and depth of flavor. Spread on a cracker or celery stick, or do as I do and scoop into a de-yolked hardboiled egg with a touch of salt for a tasty protein snack!


Leave a comment

A Tale of Two Dressings

So my favorite salad dressing in the world is ranch. But I hate all the MSG, disodium phosphate and artificial flavors found in store bought brands like Hidden Valley. Isn’t ranch supposed to be something like cream, garlic and black pepper? Can’t I just whip this up at home with a little more flavor and a little less disodium guanylate? As it turns out, yes, and it’s quite simple! I made my first batch of ranch a few months ago, with a base of yogurt and light mayo, and it was the best ranch I have ever tasted in my life ever! I wanted to drink it. Ok, I did drink it. Just a little… Then two days later I had my annual check up with my doctor and she told me I had to give up dairy to help with my psoriasis. Damn! Back to the drawing board. So I came up with a second non-dairy recipe guideline that can also be made vegan if that’s what floats your boat. Both guidelines are below. I prefer the dairy version for taste, but the non-dairy version is delicious as well. And if dairy makes your belly bubble or your skin itch, the second version is a great option. Happy Health!

 * My culinary posts are meant to be guidelines, not recipes. They are different from what you would usually find in a cookbook, because I think cooking should be inspired and new every time you do it. If you like heat, add a sh**load of cayenne or jalapenos to one of my recipes. If my guideline calls for cilantro but cilantro tastes like soap to you, leave it out. When I cook I get a buzz from the thrill of creation. The same can happen to you.

 Peppercorn Ranch Dressing (Dairy Version)

Dairy Ranch

1 cup or so plain full fat yogurt (“The European Style” found at Trader Joe’s is reportedly sourced from Straus Creamery at half the price. Whether it is or isn’t, it’s freakin delish and the best brand to use if you have a Trader Joe’s near you.)

 ¼- ½ cup light mayo

 ½ to a whole raw onion

tablespoon-ish of whatever prepared mustard you fancy

however much cracked peppercorn tastes good to you

dash Worcestershire sauce

a tsp or two apple cider vinegar

1/2 cup Parmesan cheese

1 tsp garlic powder or more if you love garlic

veggie chicken broth powder I get from the Whole Foods bulk section (or you can use chicken stock. Or veggie stock. Or miso paste. Or whatever umami kick you like.)

Blend everything in a food processor or blender and drink….I mean eat up!

 

Peppercorn Ranch Dressing (Non-Dairy Version)

Non Dairy Ranch

Substitute tofu for the yogurt (silken preferably.) And either omit the Parmesan cheese or replace with non-dairy cheese of your liking. Everything else stays the same.

To make it vegan, omit the Worcestershire sauce and replace with a little more vinegar or lemon. Replace the mayo with Vegenaise.